In the News

Checkmarx Awarded Software Licensing Supply Arrangement (SLSA) to Bring Static Application Security Testing to Canadian Federal Government

16 Mar 2017 | By Business Wire

Checkmarx, a global leader in application security testing, today announced that it has been awarded a Software Licensing Supply Arrangement (SLSA) by the Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) for its CxSAST (Static Application Security Testing) solution set and support. Checkmarx’s Supply Arrangement number is EN578-100808/304/EE. This designation enables Checkmarx to streamline sales of its technology to Canada’s federal agencies, avoiding the need for a complex bidding process typically associated with purchasing of new technologies.

 

For the full article, click here.

Checkmarx, a global leader in application security testing, today announced that it has been awarded a Software Licensing Supply Arrangement (SLSA) by the Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) for its CxSAST (Static Application Security Testing) solution set and support. Checkmarx’s Supply Arrangement number is EN578-100808/304/EE. This designation enables Checkmarx to streamline sales of its technology to Canada’s federal agencies, avoiding the need for a complex bidding process typically associated with purchasing of new technologies.

 

For the full article, click here.


</close>

THE EU GDPR: what does it mean for application security?

6 Mar 2017 | By Amit Ashbel

With four out of every five businesses using 10 or more business applications, securing those applications should be paramount in the run up to March 2018. There continues to be a certain malaise among many organisations about getting ready for the GDPR, and it's incredibly surprising given the huge penalties for breaches coming into force next year. Judging by the breadth of media reports, organisations freely admit that they are not ready for the EU GDPR. At the same time, these organisations are increasingly using mobile applications so securing those applications should be high on the list of all organisations looking to avoid data breaches.

 

Click here for the full article. 

With four out of every five businesses using 10 or more business applications, securing those applications should be paramount in the run up to March 2018. There continues to be a certain malaise among many organisations about getting ready for the GDPR, and it’s incredibly surprising given the huge penalties for breaches coming into force next year. Judging by the breadth of media reports, organisations freely admit that they are not ready for the EU GDPR. At the same time, these organisations are increasingly using mobile applications so securing those applications should be high on the list of all organisations looking to avoid data breaches.

 

Click here for the full article. 


</close>

February 2017: The month in hacks and breaches

1 Mar 2017 | By CSO Staff

On February 5, an anonymous hacker kicked off February’s breaches, taking down a dark web hosting service that the hacker claimed was hosting child pornography sites. In the process, the hacker showed just how easily the dark web can be compromised.

Then, on February 10, as many as 20 hackers (or groups of hackers) exploited a recently patched REST API vulnerability to deface over 1.5 million web pages across about 40,000 WordPress websites. “The flaw was fixed in WordPress 4.7.2, released on Jan. 26, but the WordPress team did not publicly disclose the vulnerability's existence until a week later,” Lucian Constantin reported.

The month wrapped up with a breach impacting more than 800,000 user accounts from CloudPets, purveyor of smart teddy bears. The culprit: an unsecured, publicly exposed MongoDB database.

But that wasn't all the news from February. Scroll down to see a timeline of last month’s hacks and breaches, compiled by application security provider Checkmarx.

 

Read more here

On February 5, an anonymous hacker kicked off February’s breaches, taking down a dark web hosting service that the hacker claimed was hosting child pornography sites. In the process, the hacker showed just how easily the dark web can be compromised.

Then, on February 10, as many as 20 hackers (or groups of hackers) exploited a recently patched REST API vulnerability to deface over 1.5 million web pages across about 40,000 WordPress websites. “The flaw was fixed in WordPress 4.7.2, released on Jan. 26, but the WordPress team did not publicly disclose the vulnerability’s existence until a week later,” Lucian Constantin reported.

The month wrapped up with a breach impacting more than 800,000 user accounts from CloudPets, purveyor of smart teddy bears. The culprit: an unsecured, publicly exposed MongoDB database.

But that wasn’t all the news from February. Scroll down to see a timeline of last month’s hacks and breaches, compiled by application security provider Checkmarx.

 

Read more here


</close>

Guest View: Cybersecurity education isn’t a game. Or is it?

28 Feb 2017 | By Amit Ashbel

Security, specifically application security, has become a huge challenge for IT companies worldwide. Actually, most companies in any vertical nowadays have some sort of IT platform they maintain. An increasing number of exploits, causing widespread financial and technical damage, are being reported on an almost daily basis. Yet the biggest vulnerability you have is sitting right under your nose (or next to you). Sixty-six percent of respondents to a recent study from the Ponemon Institute cited employees as the biggest security threat to their company.

As a leader, the best place to start looking for employee vulnerabilities is within your own team. If you look around, you might realize that some of the key IT players and developers are uneducated and sometimes even unaware of security in their code. There’s a big gap between app developers’ coding abilities and their security literacy.

 

Read more here.

Security, specifically application security, has become a huge challenge for IT companies worldwide. Actually, most companies in any vertical nowadays have some sort of IT platform they maintain. An increasing number of exploits, causing widespread financial and technical damage, are being reported on an almost daily basis. Yet the biggest vulnerability you have is sitting right under your nose (or next to you). Sixty-six percent of respondents to a recent study from the Ponemon Institute cited employees as the biggest security threat to their company.

As a leader, the best place to start looking for employee vulnerabilities is within your own team. If you look around, you might realize that some of the key IT players and developers are uneducated and sometimes even unaware of security in their code. There’s a big gap between app developers’ coding abilities and their security literacy.

 

Read more here.


</close>

Checkmarx announces Open Beta for Scala Programming Language Vulnerability Detection

16 Feb 2017 | By Dawn Nicholls

New York: Checkmarx has announced open beta support of the Scala programming language. The new capability adds the ability to analyze and remediate security risks and vulnerabilities exposed in projects written using Scala code.

 

Checkmarx is the first static analysis solution to support Scala. The added capability not only allows the detection of vulnerabilities within Scala code, but also the ability to identify security and compliance issues in the flows between Scala and Java, and vice versa – enabling applications built using both Java and Scala to be fully analyzed using a single Checkmarx scan. With Checkmarx, users can identify a wide range of potential vulnerabilities in Scala code such as code injections, connection string injections, reflected XSS, SQL injections, stored XSS and many more.

The growing success of the Scala programming language has incentivized organizations globally to shift away from using Java, with Scala predicted to become a preferred choice by developers. Due to the rise in popularity, there is an urgent need to address the risks that may be exposed if coding is not done in a secure manner. Without a way to analyze Scala code statically the industry will soon find itself combating breaches exposed by bad Scala coding techniques.

 

Click here for the full article. 

New York: Checkmarx has announced open beta support of the Scala programming language. The new capability adds the ability to analyze and remediate security risks and vulnerabilities exposed in projects written using Scala code.

 

Checkmarx is the first static analysis solution to support Scala. The added capability not only allows the detection of vulnerabilities within Scala code, but also the ability to identify security and compliance issues in the flows between Scala and Java, and vice versa – enabling applications built using both Java and Scala to be fully analyzed using a single Checkmarx scan. With Checkmarx, users can identify a wide range of potential vulnerabilities in Scala code such as code injections, connection string injections, reflected XSS, SQL injections, stored XSS and many more.

The growing success of the Scala programming language has incentivized organizations globally to shift away from using Java, with Scala predicted to become a preferred choice by developers. Due to the rise in popularity, there is an urgent need to address the risks that may be exposed if coding is not done in a secure manner. Without a way to analyze Scala code statically the industry will soon find itself combating breaches exposed by bad Scala coding techniques.

 

Click here for the full article. 


</close>

A Modern Day Love Story: Security and DevOps

13 Feb 2017 | By Amit Ashbel

It’s a tale as old as time, the last person you ever thought you would love becomes the one person you can’t live without. Enter – software security and developer teams, did you see that one coming? While these teams may not always see eye to eye, one cannot succeed without support from the other.

For starters, it’s important to take a look at the differences between developers and security teams to better understand the complex relationship. Developers are on a constant time crunch to meet deadlines and code faster than ever before to make sure their product hits the market in a timely fashion. They are most concerned with how quickly an application can go to market, and the perceived time needed for security testing has caused security to be put on the backburner.

 

Continue reading here

It’s a tale as old as time, the last person you ever thought you would love becomes the one person you can’t live without. Enter – software security and developer teams, did you see that one coming? While these teams may not always see eye to eye, one cannot succeed without support from the other.

For starters, it’s important to take a look at the differences between developers and security teams to better understand the complex relationship. Developers are on a constant time crunch to meet deadlines and code faster than ever before to make sure their product hits the market in a timely fashion. They are most concerned with how quickly an application can go to market, and the perceived time needed for security testing has caused security to be put on the backburner.

 

Continue reading here


</close>

Executive Viewpoint 2017 Prediction: Checkmarx – Spotting Software Trends and Beyond

6 Feb 2017 | By Paul Curran

Software is now embedded in every aspect of modern day business, making it critical for organizations to understand how the industry is evolving and where it’s headed. The internet, with the addition of software, has changed the way people and businesses interact and engage, especially when you consider the fact that there are over 4.5 million apps available on platforms such as Google, Apple and Microsoft. Software is the driving force behind everyday tasks like communicating with clients and driving to work. At Checkmarx, we’re keeping an eye on the software industry to spot trends and opportunities in the application space and adapt accordingly.

 

The full article can be found here

Software is now embedded in every aspect of modern day business, making it critical for organizations to understand how the industry is evolving and where it’s headed. The internet, with the addition of software, has changed the way people and businesses interact and engage, especially when you consider the fact that there are over 4.5 million apps available on platforms such as Google, Apple and Microsoft. Software is the driving force behind everyday tasks like communicating with clients and driving to work. At Checkmarx, we’re keeping an eye on the software industry to spot trends and opportunities in the application space and adapt accordingly.

 

The full article can be found here


</close>

January 2017: The month in hacks and breaches

6 Feb 2017 | By CSO Staff

Then, on January 19th, internet account passwords for 14 Trump appointees, including Rudy Giuliani and Michael Flynn, were leaked online, the result of “mass breaches of websites like LinkedIn, MySpace, and others between 2012 and 2016,” according to a report by Britain’s Channel 4.

But that wasn't all the news from January. Scroll down to see a timeline of last month’s hacks and breaches, compiled by application security provider Checkmarx.

 

For the full article and infographic, click here

Then, on January 19th, internet account passwords for 14 Trump appointees, including Rudy Giuliani and Michael Flynn, were leaked online, the result of “mass breaches of websites like LinkedIn, MySpace, and others between 2012 and 2016,” according to a report by Britain’s Channel 4.

But that wasn’t all the news from January. Scroll down to see a timeline of last month’s hacks and breaches, compiled by application security provider Checkmarx.

 

For the full article and infographic, click here


</close>

J is for Java Script

6 Feb 2017 | By Network Computing

J is for JavaScript. JavaScript is a core component of and present in almost every element of the web browsing experience. Because of the prolific nature of JavaScript on the web, any JavaScript vulnerabilities that are identified are valuable to cybercriminals and can be exploited to attack websites, individuals and networks.

"This programming language was developed under the code name Mocha and was originally known as LiveScript. It was created in just 10 days by Netscape Communications Corporation and the programmer, Brendan Eich, later went on to co-found the Mozilla Project", explains Amit Ashbel, Cyber Security Evangelist at Checkmarx.

Amit continues with the history, saying "The language was created by Eich as a more accessible glue type language for casual programmers who were building web content instead of Java, which was seen as a component language used by higher priced programmers. Despite the confusion between Java and JavaScript, the name change from LiveScript to JavaScript actually worked as a marketing tactic to capitalise on the hot programming language of the time."

 

For the full article, click here

J is for JavaScript. JavaScript is a core component of and present in almost every element of the web browsing experience. Because of the prolific nature of JavaScript on the web, any JavaScript vulnerabilities that are identified are valuable to cybercriminals and can be exploited to attack websites, individuals and networks.

“This programming language was developed under the code name Mocha and was originally known as LiveScript. It was created in just 10 days by Netscape Communications Corporation and the programmer, Brendan Eich, later went on to co-found the Mozilla Project”, explains Amit Ashbel, Cyber Security Evangelist at Checkmarx.

Amit continues with the history, saying “The language was created by Eich as a more accessible glue type language for casual programmers who were building web content instead of Java, which was seen as a component language used by higher priced programmers. Despite the confusion between Java and JavaScript, the name change from LiveScript to JavaScript actually worked as a marketing tactic to capitalise on the hot programming language of the time.”

 

For the full article, click here


</close>

Checkmarx Announces Open Beta for Scala Programming Language Vulnerability Detection

1 Feb 2017 | By Business Wire

Checkmarx is the first static analysis solution to support Scala. The added capability not only allows the detection of vulnerabilities within Scala code, but also the ability to identify security and compliance issues in the flows between Scala and Java, and vice versa – enabling applications built using both Java and Scala to be fully analyzed using a single Checkmarx scan. With Checkmarx, users can identify a wide range of potential vulnerabilities in Scala code such as code injections, connection string injections, reflected XSS, SQL injections, stored XSS and many more.

 

The full article is available here

Checkmarx is the first static analysis solution to support Scala. The added capability not only allows the detection of vulnerabilities within Scala code, but also the ability to identify security and compliance issues in the flows between Scala and Java, and vice versa – enabling applications built using both Java and Scala to be fully analyzed using a single Checkmarx scan. With Checkmarx, users can identify a wide range of potential vulnerabilities in Scala code such as code injections, connection string injections, reflected XSS, SQL injections, stored XSS and many more.

 

The full article is available here


</close>

Interested in trying CxSAST on your own code? You can now use Checkmarx's solution to scan uncompiled / unbuilt source code in 18 coding and scripting languages and identify the vulnerable lines of code. CxSAST will even find the best-fix locations for you and suggest the best remediation techniques. Sign up for your FREE trial now.

Checkmarx is now offering you the opportunity to see how CxSAST identifies application-layer vulnerabilities in real-time. Our in-house security experts will run the scan and demonstrate how the solution's queries can be tweaked as per your specific needs and requirements. Fill in your details and we'll schedule a FREE live demo with you.