Groovy Security Vulnerabilities and Language Overview

Groovy vulnerabilities
What is Groovy?

First appearing in 2003, Groovy is a dynamic object-oriented programming language for the Java platform. Groovy is dynamically compiled to Java Virtual Machine (JVM) bytecode, however since the release of Groovy 2.0 in 2012, both static and dynamic typing are supported by Groovy.  

Not only is Groovy interoperable with other Java code and libraries and employs a Java-like curly-bracket syntax, it is a language with an easy learning curve which makes the development of web applications easier than other contemporary languages while remaining supportive of domain specific languages and retaining powerful processing primitives. Groovy is maintained by the Apache Software Foundation and supported by the Groovy community. The current Groovy release is 2.4.7.

Included within Groovy are a number of features which allow developers to build and maintain some of the most popular applications on the internet. These features include its flat learning curve, Java integration and more.

groovy vulnerabilities

Source: http://www.groovy-lang.org/

Why was Groovy Created?

Software developer James Strachan first discussed Groovy on his blog in mid-2003 and worked on several releases between 2004 and 2006 before leaving the Groovy project prior to the release of 1.0 in 2007, the same year this language won the JAX 2007 innovation award.

Originally, the current Groovy project lead Guillaume Laforge  notes, “Groovy was created as a companion to Java, rather than as a replacement. The idea was to be able to simplify certain aspects of the Java language to make Java developers more productive.”

In an InfoWorld interview, Laforge argues that over the course of its development, the aim of Groovy was to complement Java by adding new features that were available from other languages while leaving its syntax and look and feel very similar to Java in order to ensure that Java developers didn’t have a steep learning curve during their adoption phase.

Who uses Groovy?

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Source: http://www.groovy-lang.org/

Some of the biggest companies, brands and services from almost all verticals use Groovy and Grails for their web application development. This impressive array of companies includes Netflix, BestBuy, Sony, Target as well as many others.

 

What is Grails?

Launched in 2005, and previously known as “Groovy on Rails,” Grails is an open source web application framework that uses Groovy and is optimized for increasing the productivity of the developers using it through Convention-over-Configuration, sensible defaults and opinionated APIs.

The change from “Groovy on Rails” to simply “Grails” occurred after a request was submitted by the founder of “Ruby on Rails” in 2006. Grails integrates with JVM which allows developers to capitalize on both the productivity of Grails as well as its powerful features which include integrated ORM, Domain-Specific Languages, runtime and compile-time meta-programming and Asynchronous programming.

High-Risk Groovy Language Vulnerabilities:

As a popular open source programming language, there are serious consequences when vulnerabilities in Groovy code make it to production and are exploited by malicious parties. The following is a list of some of the high risk threats facing applications written in Groovy:

  • Reflected XSS
  • LDAP Injections
  • Resource Injections
  • Code Injections
  • Command Injections

Checkmarx’s CxSAST, a static code analysis solution, rises above other Perl testing solutions as not only the solution which will keep your Perl code free from security, legal and compliance issues, but also as the solution which will propel to your organization’s advancement when it comes to application security education amongst the developers.

CxSAST works with the IDEs and other tools that your developer teams are already using as it integrates with most of the common development programs available at every developer touchpoint of the SDLC. CxSAST’s features such as incremental code scanning and the best fix location made it ideal for any continuous integration continuous development (CICD) environment.

 

How to Secure your Groovy Code:

 

Checkmarx’s CxSAST, a static code analysis solution, rises above other Perl testing solutions as not only the solution which will keep your Perl code free from security, legal and compliance issues, but also as the solution which will propel to your organization’s advancement when it comes to application security education amongst the developers.

CxSAST works with the IDEs and other tools that your developer teams are already using as it integrates with most of the common development programs available at every developer touchpoint of the SDLC. CxSAST’s features such as incremental code scanning and the best fix location made it ideal for any continuous integration continuous development (CICD) environment.

When vulnerabilities are detected in the Perl code, Checkmarx’s CxSAST will not only locate the best fix location, but will also offer resources to the developer to understand how the attack vector work as well as remediation advice which will help them ensure similar mistakes are avoided in the future.

 

Interested in trying CxSAST on your own code? You can now use Checkmarx's solution to scan uncompiled / unbuilt source code in 18 coding and scripting languages and identify the vulnerable lines of code. CxSAST will even find the best-fix locations for you and suggest the best remediation techniques. Sign up for your FREE trial now.

Checkmarx is now offering you the opportunity to see how CxSAST identifies application-layer vulnerabilities in real-time. Our in-house security experts will run the scan and demonstrate how the solution's queries can be tweaked as per your specific needs and requirements. Fill in your details and we'll schedule a FREE live demo with you.